A practical example of GitOps using Azure DevOps, Azure Container Registry, Helm, Flux and Kubernetes

GitOps is a term introduced by WeaveWorks a few years ago (https://www.weave.works/blog/gitops-operations-by-pull-request) GitOps is a way of implementing Continuous Deployment. The core idea of GitOps is having a Git repository that always contains declarative descriptions of the infrastructure currently desired in the production environment and an automated process to make the production environment match the described state in the repository. If you want to deploy a new application or update an existing one, you only need to update the repository - the automated process handles everything else.
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Trying to automate Azure Active Directory App Registration process using Terraform

Today I want to try to use Terraform to automate the app registration process in Azure Active Directory. If you want to secure an application Azure Active Directory is a really good option, but I don’t want to configure my application on AAD manually, what I really want is to add a step in my CI / CD pipeline that does that for me, and for that purpose Terraform might be a good option.
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How to restore nuget packages from an Azure DevOps Private Feed when building a Docker image

Let’s go for a quick post this time. Imagine you’re trying to create a Docker image from an application and it is using some custom nugets. Those custom nugets are hosted in your private Azure DevOps Feed. And when you try to build the image you get one of the following errors: /src/MyConsoleApplication.csproj : error NU1101: Unable to find package MyOwn.EmailService. No packages exist with this id in source(s): nuget.org Failed to restore /src/MyConsoleApplication.
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Why and how you should add a healthcheck endpoint to your Wcf legacy applications

Nowadays no one on his right mind is going to create a WCF from scratch. It really makes no sense to do it. It’s a deprecated technology, it does not work with .NET Core, only works on Windows OS and personally I found the configuration confusing as hell, every time I need to modify an existing one I have to spend a good amount of time trying to figure out what everything means.
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Enforce the use of a specific .NET Core version using Roslyn

In these past few years Microsoft has kept a steady flow of new .NET Core versions: .NET Core 1.0, 1.1, 2.0, 2.1, 2.2 and so on and so forth. If you have hundreds of applications in your company, it’s almost impossible to keep them updated to the most recent version of the framework, so most probably you’re going to end up having multiple versions running at the same time. When trying to choose which versions are you going to support in your company a factor to consider is that only a few of those versions are long-time support (LTS).
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